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Gaining the Teacher's Perspective:

TEACHER RELATIONSHIP INTERVIEW

Instructions to Teachers:

For the next half-hour or so, I will be asking you some questions about your relationship with name of child.

RELATIONSHIP WITH CHILD

1. Please chose 3 words that tell about your relationship with name.

Now, for each word please tell me a specific experience or time that describes that word. (Re-ask the question twice to get specific experiences. If needed, say "like for `fun'; tell me about a time when your relationship with name was fun"). Go through each word separately. Make sure that they give a specific example if at all possible.

2. Tell me about a specific time that you can think of when you and name really "clicked." (Probe if necessary: tell me more about what happened.) How did you feel? How do you think name felt?

3. Now, tell me about a specific time you can think of when you and name really weren't "clicking." (Probe if necessary: tell me more about what happened. How did you feel? How do you think name felt?)

4. What kind of social experiences do you feel have been particularly difficult or challenging (hard, tough) for name?

5. Teachers wonder about how much to push a child to learn what is difficult (hard) versus how much not to push. Tell me about a time that this happened for you with name. How did you and name handle this situation? How did you feel in this situation? How do you think name felt?

6. Tell me about a time recently when name misbehaved (probe for a specific situation). What did you do? Why? How did you feel in this situation? How do you think name felt?

7. Tell me about a time when name was upset and came to you. What did you do? Why? How did you feel in this situation? How do you think name felt?

8. Every teacher has at least occasional doubts about whether they are meeting a child's needs. What brings this up for you with name? How do you handle these doubts?

9. Do you ever think about name when you are at home? What do you think about?

10. What gives you the most satisfaction being name's teacher? Why?

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STRS

STRS-Short Form

Scoring and Interpreting the STRS

1. Fill out identifying information on "STRS SCORING SHEET" or "STRS-Short Form SCORING SHEET."

2. Transfer item scores from the questionnaire into each column labeled "Original."

3. Reverse items for Conflict and Dependency2 Scales (these reversed scores will be used for calculating the Total score). Reversed scores are created by making the following changes: 1 · 5, 2 · 4, 3 · 3, 4 · 2, and 5 · 1.

4. Sum each column.

5. Record Scale Scores on spaces provided under Child's Scale Scores. Use Original columns for this step.

6. For Total score, sum Closeness total with the reversed scale totals from the Conflict and Dependency columns. Record Total score in space provided under Child's Scale Scores. (For STRS-Short Form simply sum Closeness and the reversed Conflict scores.)

7. If the teacher has filled out multiple STRS's, average the scale scores and record this number under the column labeled, "Teacher's Average Scale Scores."

8. Turn to the Appendix and record the STRS "Age-Based Norms."

9. Compare each child's scale scores to the teacher's average and the norms.

10. A high score on each scale should be interpreted to reflect a "high" level of that particular dimension. Thus, a score of 41 on the Conflict scale would suggest a fairly high level of conflict in the relationship, as described by the teacher.

11. The Total score is computed to reflect a positive relationship. Therefore, high Total scores mean an overall positive relationship reported by the teacher.

STRS Scoring Sheet

Teacher: Date completed:

Student: Child's age:

Calculating the Child's Scale Scores

Scale
Closeness
Conflict
Dependency
 

Original

Original Reversed Original Reversed
Items 1. ___ 2. ___ 2. ___ 6. ___ 6. ___
  3. ___ 11. ___ 11. ___ 8. ___ 8. ___
  4. ___ 13. ___ 13. ___ 10. ___ 10. ___
  5. ___ 16. ___ 16. ___ 14. ___ 14. ___
  7. ___ 18. ___ 18. ___ 17. ___ 17. ___
  9. ___ 19. ___ 19. ___    
  12. ___ 20. ___ 20. ___    
  15. ___ 22. ___ 22. ___    
  21. ___ 23. ___ 23. ___    
  27. ___ 24. ___ 24. ___    
  28. ___ 25. ___ 25. ___    
    26. ___ 26. ___    
Scale Totals

_______

_______ _______ _______ _______

Comparing Child's Scale Scores to Teacher's Average

and Age-Based Norms

 
Child's

Scale Scores

Teacher's Average

Scale Scores

Age-Based Norms
Closeness
_____
_____
_____
Conflict
_____
_____
_____
Dependency
_____
_____
_____
Total Score
_____
_____
_____

STRS-Short Form Scoring Sheet

Teacher: Date completed:

Student: Child's age:

Calculating the Child's Scale Scores
Scale
Closeness
Conflict
 

Original

Original Reversed
Items 1. ___ 2. ___ 2. ___
  3. ___ 8. ___ 8. ___
  4. ___ 10. ___ 10. ___
  5. ___ 11. ___ 11. ___
  6. ___ 12. ___ 12. ___
  7. ___ 13. ___ 13. ___
  9. ___ 14. ___ 14. ___
  15. ___    
Scale Totals _________ _______ ________

Comparing Child's Scale Scores to Teacher's Average

and Age-Based Norms

 
Child's

scale scores

Teacher's average

scale scores

Age-based norms
Closeness
_____
_____
_____
Conflict
_____
_____
_____
Total Score
_____
_____
_____

Conducting Classroom Observations

When constructing an observation system, remember to:

1. Describe observable behavior. Rather than writing "teacher likes the child," use behaviors that can be objectively observed such as, "teacher smiles frequently at child" or "teacher maintains physical proximity to the child when she is upset or frustrated."

2. Be as clear and concise as possible. Use short, simple, and unambiguous terms.

3. Avoid using terms that are general in nature or that imply value judgments such as, average, excellent, or very. Words that imply that behavior is either good or bad may influence the ratings.

4. Try to keep the constructs as discrete as possible. There will inevitably be some overlap among constructs (e.g., positive emotional climate and positive teacher-child interaction). However, more information can be gleaned from observations if the constructs are defined by behaviors that are unique and specific to each scale.

5. Provide descriptions of high, middle, and low points on the scale. These points may be written for each individual construct but may be clearer and more consistent if written to apply to all constructs. An example of scale point descriptions that could apply across a variety of constructs follows. If using a scale such as the one that follows, write the definitions to describe the high end of the scale. The low end of the scale is defined by the absence of this construct. For example, in describing positive affect, the low end would be few or no instances of smiles, hugs, or laughter rather than the presence of negative affect such as yelling.

Sample Scale Point Descriptions

5 = Very or always characteristic. This was observed throughout the observation and/or with all the children in the classroom.

4 = Fairly or usually characteristic. This was observed through the majority of the observation and/or with most of the children.

3 = Somewhat or sometimes characteristic. This was observed through part of the observation and/or with some of the children.

2 = Not very or rarely characteristic. This was occasionally observed during the observation and/or with a few children.

1 = Not at all or never characteristic. This was not observed in the classroom and/or with any of the children in the classroom.

Below are several examples of constructs that may be observed in the classroom. Brief descriptions are provided, however additional behaviors and descriptive statements may be added to provide a more complete construct definition. Constructs may apply to the classroom as a whole or to an individual teacher, child or dyad. Additional constructs may be written using the guidelines provided above. A sample scoring sheet is also provided.

2 Dependency scale is not available on the STRS-Short Form.

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