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DECUSHISTORY

DECCIVICS

 

Unit II – The Constitution and the American Government

      EOC PREP

Competency Goal 2: The learner will analyze how the government established by the United States Constitution embodies the purposes, values, and principles of American democracy.

Generalizations:
• Governments can be structured in order to address the needs of the people who are governed.
• Leaders are often elected by the people and are expected to represent the interests of the electorate.
• Power to govern is sometimes divided among different groups and these groups are often at odds over how best to implement a
democratic system.

Objectives

2.01 Identify principles in the United States Constitution.

Essential Questions

• 2.01 How does the system of checks and balances limit the power of government officials?
• 2.01 How is the idea of limited government promoted in the United States Constitution?
• 2.01 Should Congress be able to pass a law that is unpopular with citizens?
• 2.02 How do the three branches of government work together in order to provide leadership for the people?

Macro Concepts
Structure

Micro Concepts

Constitution
Popular Sovereignty
Federalism
Separation of Powers
Checks & Balances
Limited Government
Flexibility

Factual Content

Preamble
(Federalism)
Full Faith and Credit Clause
Supremacy Clause
(Separation of Powers/
Checks and Balances)
Legislative Branch
Executive Branch
Judicial Branch
Enumerated Powers
Un-enumerated Powers
Expressed Powers
Delegated Powers
Reserved Powers
Concurrent Powers
(Flexibility)
Elastic Clause (Necessary and Proper Clause)
Implied Powers
“Living Document”

2.02 Explain how the United States Constitution defines the framework, organization and structure of the three branches of government at the national level.

Essential Questions

• 2.02 How do the three branches of government work together in order to provide leadership for the people?
• 2.02 How does the Constitution provide for leadership within each of the three branches of government?
• 2.02 Should Supreme Court Justices be elected by the people

Macro Concepts

Structure
Interdependence

Micro Concepts

Leadership
Branches of Government
Separation of Power

Factual Content

(Legislative Branch)
Speaker of the House
President Pro Tempore
President of the Senate
House of Representatives
Senate
Bill/Law
The Committee System
Cloture
Filibuster
Apportionment
Non-legislative Powers
Immunity
Censure
Expulsion
Seniority System
Majority & Minority Leaders
Party Whips
Impeachment
(Executive Branch)
Presidential Succession
State of the Union Address
Veto Power
Executive Agreement
Commander-in-Chief
Chief Diplomat
Chief Executive
Party Leader
Legislative Leader
Head-of-State
Economic Leader

Executive Orders
Treaty
(Judicial Branch)
U.S. Supreme Court
Chief Justice
Associate Justices
Original Jurisdiction
Appellate Jurisdiction
Concurrent Jurisdiction
Exclusive Jurisdiction

2.03 Explain how the United States Constitution grants and limits the authority of public officials and government agencies.

Essential Questions

• In what ways does the U.S. Constitution limit the power of public officials?
• What limits does the U.S. Constitution place on the powers of Congress?
• Should the Supreme Court be the ultimate authority in interpreting the Constitution?

Macro Concepts

Authority

Micro Concepts

Governmental
restraint

Factual Content

(Governmental restraint)
Impeachment
Pardons
Commutations
Reprieve

Writ of Habeas Corpus
Bill of Attainder
Ex post facto laws
Judicial Review
Veto Power
Supremacy Clause
Articles 1, 2, & 3
Censure
Expulsion
Immunity

2.04 Describe how the United States Constitution may be changed and analyze the impact of specific changes.

Essential Questions

• 2.04 How has the Constitution provided the government the ability to adjust to a changing society?
• 2.04 How have constitutional amendments changed suffrage rights throughout the United States’ history?
• 2.04 Is it necessary to treat all people the same in order to ensure justice and equality?

Macro Concepts

Change

Micro Concepts

Amendment
Interpretation

Factual Content

(Amendment)
Constitutional Convention
Amendments 1 – 27
Citizenship
Suffrage
Presidential Succession and Term Limits
(Interpretation)
Judicial Decisions and Review
Equal protection
Due Process
Term Limits

2.05 Analyze court cases that illustrate that the United States Constitution is the supreme law of the land.

Essential Questions

• 2.05 How has the Supreme Court used its power of judicial review to ensure equality for all citizens?
• 2.05 How has the Supreme Court changed its views to adjust to changing times?
• 2.05 Is the Supreme Court the most powerful of the three branches of government?

Macro Concepts

Change

Micro Concepts

Implied Powers
Judicial review
Elastic clause
National Supremacy

Factual Content

(Implied Powers)
Plessy v. Ferguson 1896
Brown v. Board of Education 1954
Swann v. Charlotte- Mecklenburg Board of Education 1969
Korematsu vs. US 1944
Heart of Atlanta Motel, Inc. v. United States 1964
(Judicial review)
Marbury v. Madison 1803
(Elastic clause)
McCulloch v. Maryland 1819
Gibbons v. Ogden 1824

2.06 Analyze court cases that demonstrate how the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights protect the rights of individuals.

Essential Questions

• 2.06 How has the U.S. Supreme Court protected the rights of citizens under the age of 18?
• 2.06 In what ways has the U.S. Supreme Court protected unpopular speech?
• 2.06 Should criminals have the same rights as law-abiding citizens?

Macro Concepts

Change

Micro Concepts

Individual Rights

Factual Content

(Individual Rights)
Furman v. Georgia, 1972
Gregg v. Georgia, 1976
Gideon V. Wainwright, 1963
Regents of the University of California vs. Bakke, 1978
New Jersey vs. T.L.O., 1985
Bethel School District vs. Frasier, 1986
Tinker v. Des Moines, 1969
Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier, 1988
Texas v. Johnson, 1989
Engel v. Vitale, 1962
Miranda v. Arizona, 1966
Mapp v. Ohio, 1961
In Re Gault, 1967

2.07 Identify modern controversies related to powers of the federal government that are similar to the debates between Federalists and Anti-Federalists over ratification of the United States Constitution.

Essential Questions

• 2.07 How are modern political conflicts similar to the issues debated by the Federalists and Anti-Federalists?
• 2.07 In what ways have civil liberties been limited by the government during times of crisis?
• 2.07 Should states have certain rights over the federal government?

Macro Concepts

Power
Conflict

Micro Concepts

Civil Liberties
Personal Liberties
Political Conflict

Factual Content

(Civil and Personal Liberties)
Majority rule/Minority rights
Homeland Security
Patriot Act
Right to bear arms
Separation of church and state
(Political Conflict)
Federalists
Anti-Federalists

Term limits for government officials
Redistricting
Interest Groups
Strict versus loose constructionist views of the Constitution
States Rights
Electoral College and process

2.08 Examine taxation and other revenue sources at the national level of government.

Essential Questions

• 2.08 How can the different types of revenue impact the government’s ability to operate in the best interest of its citizenry?
• 2.08 How might the government’s power to tax impact citizens of varying degrees of wealth?
• 2.08 Should everyone be forced to pay taxes?

Macro Concepts
Power
Systems

Micro Concepts
Taxation
Revenue
Expenditures

Factual Content

(Revenue and Expenditures)
Regressive taxation
Progressive taxation

Proportional taxation
Income tax
Excise tax
Corporate tax
Estate tax
User fees
Tariffs
Social Security
Budget deficit/Surplus
National debt
Tax returns
Fines
Bonds

2.09: Describe the services provided by selected government agencies and how funding is provided.

Essential Questions

• In what ways do government agencies protect the safety of citizens?
• How are various government agencies funded?
• Should immigration to the United States be limited?

Macro Concept

Systems

Micro Concepts

Agencies
National security
Transportation
Conservation
Immigration
Naturalization
Crime control
Policy Formation

Factual Content

(Crime control)
Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA)
Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms (ATF)
(National Security)
Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)
Department of Homeland Security
(Transportation)
Department of Transportation (DOT)
National Transportation Safety Board
(Immigration and naturalization)
U. S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
(Policy Formation)
Federal Emergency Management

Primary Sources:

Before 1400 * 1400-1500 * 1501-1600 * 1601-1650 *1651-1700 *1701-1725 *1726-1750 * 1751-1775 *1776-1800

Ben's Guide: Our Nation

Other Resources

Timeline

Revolutionary War Cycle

Supplemental Readings

THE COLONIAL PERIOD
COLONIAL ERA
THE ROAD TO INDEPENDENCE
THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION
TRANSITION TO SELF-RULE
THE FORMATION OF A NATIONAL GOVERNMENT