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3

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DECUSHISTORY

DECCIVICS

 

 

Unit I : The New Nation (1789-1820)

Competency Goal 1: The New Nation (1789-1820) - The learner will identify, investigate, and assess the effectiveness of the institutions of the emerging republic.

Generalizations:

• Groups and individuals pursuing their own goals may influence the priorities and actions of a government.
• Relationships between nations can impact both domestic and foreign affairs.
• Leaders can modify the institutions of government in response to the challenges of their time.

Objective 1.01: Identify the major domestic issues and conflicts experienced by the nation during the Federalist Period.

Essential Questions:

• What was the impact of the major domestic issues and conflicts experienced by the nation during the Federalist Era?
• How did the U.S. government emerge out of competing processes of conflict and compromise?
• How did the Federalist Period contribute to the long-standing debate in America about the role of government and the distribution of
power?
• How is the U.S. Constitution a document subject to change and interpretation?

Macro Concepts:

Revolution
Conflict
Power
Change
Leadership

Micro Concepts:

States’ rights
Nationalism
Nullification

Factual Content

Strict & loose interpretations of the Constitution
Judiciary Act of 1789
Hamilton's Economic Plan
Laissez-faire
Bill of Rights
Whiskey Rebellion
Democratic-Republican Party
Federalist Party
Alien & Sedition Acts
Virginia & Kentucky Resolutions
"Midnight Judges"
Election of 1800
Marbury v. Madison, (1803)
John Marshall
Louisiana Purchase
Hartford Convention (1814)

Objective 1.02: Analyze the political freedoms available to the following groups prior to 1820: women, wage earners, landless farmers, American Indians, African Americans, and other ethnic groups.

Essential Questions:

• How did the distribution of political and economic power reflect the social structure and geographic diversity of the Federalist Era?
• How effective were the political, social, and economic institutions of the emerging republic in creating a democratic foundation for the
United States?
• How can individual rights and the government’s view of the “common good” create conflict or stability?

Macro Concepts:

Diversity
Power
Status

Micro Concepts:

Suffrage
Citizenship
Class
Race and ethnicity
Gender

Factual Content

Suffrage requirements
Tecumseh
Treaty of Greenville 1796
Abigail Adams

Objective 1.03: Assess commercial and diplomatic relationships with Britain, France, and other nations.

Essential Questions:

• How did the U.S. confront internal and international conflicts during this era?
• How does a nation’s involvement in international conflicts affect its identity?
• Should a nation form trade agreements with nations it disagrees with politically?

Macro Concepts:

Conflict
Power
Revolution

Micro Concepts:

Foreign policy
Neutrality
Trade
Diplomacy
Impressment

Factual Content

President Washingtons Proclamation of Neutrality
Jays Treaty
Pinckneys Treaty
President Washingtons Farewell Address
XYZ Affair
Convention of 1800
Embargo Act 1807
War of 1812
Battle of New Orleans
Treaty of Ghent
Adams-Onis Treaty

Primary Sources:

1701-1725 *1726-1750 * 1751-1775 * 1776-1800

Library of Congress Resources

Other Resources

Timeline

Revolutionary War Cycle

Supplemental Readings

Digital History

USINFO

SPARKNOTES

 

.Org," Chris Kenan, "Glencoe American Vision" Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.

Copyright © 2007 (Patrick Minges). Design by Andreas Viklund.