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Unit II : Expansion and Reform (1801-1850)

Competency Goal 2: Expansion and Reform (1801-1850) - The learner will assess the competing forces of expansionism, nationalism, and sectionalism.

Generalizations:

• Sectional priorities can shape the policies of a national government.
• Individuals and groups can effect change at the local, state and national levels.
• Expansionism can contribute to both nationalism and sectionalism.

Objectives

2.01 Analyze the effects of territorial expansion and the admission of new states to the Union.

Essential Questions:

• 2.01 What tactics can citizens use to influence government?
• 2.01 How can expansion lead to conflict and change?
• 2.01 What affect did territorial expansion have on the development of the new nation?

Macro Concepts:

Migration
Conflict
Change

Micro Concepts:

Expansionism
Manifest destiny
Nationalism
Sectionalism
Slavery

Factual Content

Lewis and Clark
Missouri Compromise
The Indian Removal Act 1830
Sequoyah
Worchester v. Georgia, 1832
Trail of Tears
Stephen Austin
The Alamo
Webster-Ashburton Treaty (1842)
Oregon Trail
"54-40 or Fight!"
Election of 1844
Texas Annexation
"54-40 or Fight!"
Wilmot Proviso
Mexican War
Treaty of Guadalupe- Hidalgo
Mexican Cession
49ers
Gadsden Purchase

2.02 Describe how the growth of nationalism and sectionalism were reflected in art, literature, and language.

Essential Questions:

• 2.02 How did the art, literature, and language of 1801-1850 reflect a collective sense of nationalism and sectionalism?
• 2.02 How did the U.S. develop and express its unique style through the arts during the early 1800s?
• 2.02 Are art and literature effective formats for communicating political and social discontent?

Macro Concepts:

Conflict
Style

Micro Concepts:
Nationalism
Sectionalism
Transcendentalism

Factual Content

Noah Webster
Neoclassical Architecture
New Nationalists/ Knickerbocker School
Washington Irving
Nathaniel Hawthorne
James Fenimore Cooper
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Henry David Thoreau
Washington Irving
Edgar Allen Poe
Alex de Tocqueville
Hudson River School

2.03 Distinguish between the economic and social issues that led to sectionalism and nationalism.

Essential Questions:

• 2.03 How were nationalism and sectionalism reflected in economic and social issues of the era?
• 2.03 How do economic and social conditions and issues contribute to the differences in sectionalism and nationalism?
• 2.03 How do economic and social conditions effect innovation and change?

Macro Concepts:

Change
Innovation
System

Micro Concepts:
Industrialization
Nationalism
Sectionalism
Interchangeable Parts
Internal Improvements
Factory System
Plantation System
Slavery

Factual Content

Industrial Revolution
Eli Whitney
Cotton gin
John Deere
Steel plow
Cyrus McCormick
Samuel Morse
Robert Fulton
Erie Canal
Cotton Kingdom
Sewing machine

2.04 Assess political events, issues, and personalities that contributed to sectionalism and nationalism.

Essential Questions:

• In what ways were nationalism and sectionalism reflected in the politics and issues of the time period?
• How was the issue of slavery affected by territorial expansion?
• How did the politics of industrialization lead to conflict and change?
• To what extent were the leadership and personalities of the early 1800s responsible for the changes that occurred?

Macro Concepts:

Change
Migration
Conflict
Leadership

Micro Concepts:

Jacksonian Democracy
Nationalism
Sectionalism
States’ rights
Spoils System

Factual Content

Era of Good Feelings
Panic of 1819
McCulloch v. Maryland, 1819
Monroe Doctrine
Gibbons v. Ogden, 1824
Election of 1824
"corrupt bargain"
Henry Clay's American System
White manhood
suffrage
Tariff of Abomination
John C. Calhoun
South Carolina Exposition and Protest
South Carolina Nullification Crisis
Nat Turner's Rebellion
Election of 1832
Pet Banks
Whig Party
Election of 1840

2.05 Identify the major reform movements and evaluate their effectiveness.

Essential Questions:

• What characteristics define a perfect society?
• How is change influenced by the actions of citizens?
• To what extent was the debate over slavery essential to the reform movements?

Macro Concepts:

Reform
Equality
Status

Micro Concepts:

Suffrage
Nationalism
Sectionalism
Perfectionism
Freedom
Slavery
Abolition

Factual Content

Dorothea Dix
Rehabilitation
Prison Reform
Horace Mann
Temperance Movement
Women’s Rights
Elizabeth Cady Stanton
Lucretia Mott
Seneca Falls Convention
Sojourner Truth
Susan B. Anthony
Utopian Communities
Brook Farm
Oneida
New Harmony
Mormons
Joseph Smith
Brigham Young
2nd Great Awakening

2.06 Evaluate the role of religion in the debate over slavery and other social movements and issues.

Essential Questions:

• How did both sides of the abolitionist movement use religion to support their viewpoint?
• How did differing religious beliefs contribute to an increase in the sectional divisiveness of the country?
• In what ways did religious influence impact the effectiveness of social movements in the first part of the 19th century?

Macro Concepts:

Status
Reform

Micro Concepts:

Perfectionism
Sectionalism
Slavery
Abolition
Emancipation

Factual Content

“Necessary evil”
William Lloyd Garrison
Grimke Sisters
David Walker
Frederick Douglass
Charles G. Finney
Second Great Awakening

Primary Sources:

1801-1825 * 1826-1850

Library of Congress Resources

Other Resources

Library of Congress Resources

Supplemental Readings

Digital History

USINFO

SPARKNOTES