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Unit V : Becoming an Industrial Society (1877-1900)

Competency Goal 5: Becoming an Industrial Society (1877-1900) - The learner will describe innovations in technology and business practices and assess their impact on economic, political, and social life in America.

Generalizations:

• Government policies may encourage economic growth and promote innovation in technology.
• Coordinated action by groups or individuals can effect change in business practices and economic policies.
• Innovations in technology and business practices may impact the economic, political, and social lives of citizens.

Objectives

5.01 Evaluate the influence of immigration and rapid industrialization on urban life.

Essential Questions:

• How did immigration and industrialization shape urban life?
• How did the rapid industrialization of the Gilded Age create economic, social, and political change in the U.S.?
• Did immigration and rapid industrialization have a positive or negative impact on the economic and social structure of the United States?

Macro Concepts:

Conflict
Change
Innovation
Reform

Micro Concepts:

Industrialization
Immigration
Urbanization
Nativism
Cultural pluralism
Melting pot
Culture shock

Factual Content

Elevator
Electric trolleys
Telephone
Alexander Graham Bell
Thomas Edison
Typewriter
"New" immigrants vs. "Old" immigrants
Jacob Riis
Ellis Island
Settlement houses
Jane Addams
Dumbbell tenements
Chinese Exclusion Act
Sweatshops
Amusement parks
Spectator sports
Frederick Olmstead

5.02 Explain how business and industrial leaders accumulated wealth and wielded political and economic power.

Essential Questions:

• What characteristics were vital to the success of industrial leaders of the Gilded Age?
• How did captains of industry accumulate wealth and power?
• Should an individual be allowed to accumulate as much wealth as possible?

Macro Concepts:

Power
Change
Innovation
Conflict

Micro Concepts:

Supply and demand
Laissez-faire
Social Darwinism
Monopoly
Vertical Integration
Horizontal Integration

Factual Content

Edwin Drake
Bessemer Process
Andrew Carnegie
Gospel of Wealth
J. P. Morgan
U. S. Steel
John D. Rockefeller
Standard Oil Company
Vanderbilt family
George Westinghouse
Horatio Alger
Herbert Spencer
Gilded Age
“Captains of industry” vs. “Robber barons”

5.03 Assess the impact of labor unions on industry and the lives of workers.

Essential Questions:

• Why social, economic, and political factors led to the need for the formation of labor unions?
• To what extent were labor unions effective in meeting the political, economic, and social needs of laborers?
• How effective were labor unions in improving the lives of American workers?

Macro Concepts:

Change
Power
Conflict

Micro Concepts:

Industrialization
Immigration
Socialism
Negotiation
Mediation
Collective bargaining
Arbitration

Factual Content

Working conditions
Wages
Child labor
Craft unions
Trade unions
Knights of Labor
Haymarket Riot
American Federation of Labor
Samuel Gompers
Eugene Debs
Strike
Yellow-dog contract
Closed shop
Lockout
Scabs
Blacklist
Injunction
Sherman Antitrust Act
The Great Strike (1877)
Homestead Strike
Pullman Strike

5.04 Describe the changing role of government in economic and political affairs.

Essential Questions:

• How did the government’s role in economic and political affairs change during this era?
• To what extent did industrialization affect the relationships between government, business, and the worker?
• How did technological advancement affect industrialization and the role of the government?
• To what extent was the government’s changing role necessary and positive in this era?

Macro Concepts:

Power
Change
Conflict
Reform

Micro Concepts:

Laissez-faire
Industrialization
Immigration
Urbanization
Populism

Factual Content

Pendleton Act
Civil service system
Sherman Antitrust Act
Political machines
Boss Tweed
Tammany Hall
Thomas Nast
Graft
Credit Mobilier scandal
Whiskey Ring scandal
Secret ballot (Australian)
Initiative
Referendum
Recall
Mugwumps
U.S. v. E.C. Knight, Co. 1895

Primary Sources:

1901-1925

Other Resources

Timeline

Library of Congress Resources

Supplemental Readings

Digital History

USINFO

SPARKNOTES

The Gilded Age (1876-1900)