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Unit IX : Prosperity and Depression (1919-1939)

Competency Goal 9: Prosperity and Depression (1919-1939) - The learner will appraise the economic, social, and political changes of the decades of "The Twenties" and "The Thirties."

Generalizations:

• An individual’s economic status may affect their political and economic priorities.
• The national government may increases its scope of power during times of crisis.
• An individual’s sense of identity can shape their social and cultural priorities.

Objectives

9.01 Elaborate on the cycle of economic boom and bust in the 1920's and 1930's.

Essential Questions:

• How did the economic, social, and political events of the early 1900s lead to the economic cycles of the twenties and thirties?
• How did the variations in the economy in the 1920s cause major changes in that decade and in the 1930s?
• How did early government reactions to the economic bust serve to worsen its effects?

Macro Concepts:

Leadership
Change

Micro Concepts:

Industrialization
Laissez-faire
Mechanization
Rugged individualism

Factual Content

Warren G. Harding
"Return to Normalcy"
Teapot Dome scandal
Albert Fall
Hawley-Smoot Tariff
Speculation
Buying on the margin
Mechanization
"Black Tuesday"
Herbert Hoover
Direct relief

9.02 Analyze the extent of prosperity for different segments of society during this period.

Essential Questions:

• How were different groups of people affected by the business cycles of the 1920s and 1930s?
• How do economic changes impact society?
• Why and how does economic prosperity vary so much from one segment of society to the next?

Macro Concepts:

Markets
Change

Micro Concepts:

Urbanization
Business cycle

Factual Content

Easy credit
Installment plan
Overproduction
Hoovervilles
Soup kitchens
Breadlines
Bonus Army
Dust Bowl

9.03 Analyze the significance of social, intellectual, and technological changes of lifestyles in the United States.

Essential Questions:

• How do technological and social changes impact American traditions?
• To what extent should the federal government attempt to effect economic and social change?
• What should the role of the federal government be in the economic and social lives of its citizens?
• What long term effects did the New Deal have on the United States?

Macro Concepts:

Change
Conflict
Communication
Innovation

Micro Concepts:

Technology
Consumerism

Factual Content

Jazz
Louis Armstrong
Silent and "talkies" films
"The Jazz Singer"
Lost Generation
F. Scott Fitzgerald
Ernest Hemingway
Sinclair Lewis
Speakeasies
Bootleggers
Babe Ruth
Charles Lindbergh
Automobiles
Market/advertising
Radio
FDR's "Fireside Chats"

9.04 Describe challenges to traditional practices in religion, race, and gender.

Essential Questions:

• How were government programs in the 1920s and 30s a challenge to traditional practices in religion, race, and gender?
• How does conflict promote change in a nation’s identity?
• To what degree did America experience social progress during the 1920s and 30s?
• How was America changed the 1920s and 30s?

Macro Concepts:

Equality
Conflict
Identity
Culture
Diversity

Micro Concepts:

Suffrage
Segregation
Fundamentalism
Gender

Factual Content

Ku Klux Klan
Harlem Renaissance
Langston Hughes
Zora Neal Hurston
Marcus Garvey
United Negro Improvement Association
“Back to Africa” Movement
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)
W.E.B. Dubois
1924 Native American Suffrage Act
Sacco and Vanzetti
Scopes Trial
Aimee Semple McPherson
Billy Sunday
Margaret Sanger
Flappers

9.05 Assess the impact of New Deal reforms in enlarging the role of the federal government in American life.

Essential Questions:

• How did the role of the federal government change during the 1920s ands 30s?
• Is it appropriate for the government to be involved in social and economic change?
• To what degree did America change positively or negatively during the 1920s and 30s?
• Why did citizens allow the federal government to increase its power during the Great Depression, and how did it impact the future of the
nation?

Macro Concepts:

Reform
Power
Change
Leadership
Innovation

Micro Concepts:

Federalism
Business cycle
Capitalism
Socialism

Factual Content

Deficit spending
Social Security
Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC)
Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA)
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC)
Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)
National Industrial Recovery Act (NIRA)
Public Works Administration (PWA)
Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)
Works Progress Administration (WPA)
National Labor Relations Act (Wagner Act)
Fair Labor Standards Act
Father Charles Coughlin
Huey P. Long
Frances Perkins

Primary Sources:

Hard Times

1926-1950

Other Resources

Timeline

World War Cycle

Library of Congress Resources

Supplemental Readings

Digital History

USINFO

SPARKNOTES